content top

Want Fall Color?

Want fall color? Not willing to wait for the peak period in your neighborhood if your neighborhood has a fall color season? Just go to your local garden center. If they have stylish cute down pat, you can get mosaic maize, steroid fed mums ready to bust a gut and pumpkins, pumpkins and more gourds. Scheuermann Farms in Warwick, NY has elevated garden center cute to workshop stylish. It could be a photography workshop locale with all sorts of color opportunities. Lot’s going on there, lot’s – almost spent pumpkin patches, onion packing houses, mums ready to go, a wood market shed adorned with hanging corn and massive gourd bins.

Gourds, the crown jewels of their autumnal offerings, are on display in stacked wood packing crates at one end of their market shed – maybe a hundred or so crates arranged with hay bales, pumpkins, jumbo gourds and some potted coleus for a delicate green touch. Quite a show hence my tribute to the Scheuermann’s shop.

Click on image for larger view.

Read More

St. George’s Bridges

While all you nice folks are snoozing away we are out scouring the waterways, camera in hand, looking for pics. Night or day – doesn’t matter. Like big city newspapers of soon to be bygone days, we never sleep. Unlike the good old days, you don’t have to retrieve a soggy newspaper from the driveway bushes. You are just one click away from pics.

Click on image for larger view.

Read More

Color Is Coming

Fall color in trees is drifting south with us as are the Canadian Geese. The last market corn is being picked this week in southern New York. Feed corn looks dry and ready if it is still in the field. Fields have a rich green blanket of winter rye. Onions are grated and drying before shipment to market. And orchards are peaking. It is time to drive out from the city for a weekend excursion to buy some apples and to check, in person, on the upcoming fall festivals. A grand time of the year particularly when we are treated to clear crisp weather and nights cool enough to produce ground fog which gives the countryside a lovely soft colored look.

We will continue south until we outrun this color. Canadian geese on the other hand will stop wherever they can mooch food.

Click on image for larger view.

Read More

Last Sunset

Summer is over. Color is creeping into the hills. The fading glory of Golden Rod in the fields is most pleasant. Shadows become longer. Fields, while still green, assume a yellow cast. Soon all corn will be harvested.

Lake Champlain has been so kind to us. Since a front cleared out haze a week ago, we have had nice sunsets. Clouds make magic at sunset. They linger just above mountains to play with fading light and the mountains and with our senses. Last night, when we had only a hint of mountains, our clouds gave us a solo act light show.

People often ask us what our favorite places are. I suppose we would have to say any place we really look forward to revisiting. Penobscot Bay in Maine rates high on the list. Any place in Canada does as well because Canadians make their country such a pleasant experience. We now have a new favorite place: Lake Champlain.

We are also often asked how long we will wander by boat (don’t know – until it’s’ no longer enjoyable) and what we will do when that time comes. That I can answer: travel with camera in hand. Maybe spend a year in France – wouldn’t have to be in Peter Mayle’s Provence – anywhere. Explore the rolling hills and fields of Palouse’s farm country (SE Washington state) in the early summer and again at harvest time. We have made mental notes about what we would do if we had sufficient time to explore this area: barns – big, small, new, old, good shape, interestingly rundown – Federal style brick farm houses would offer a study in door fronts if nothing else. And to have the luxury we don’t now have to pick & choose where we are when according to the light available. We were at Fort Ti when light conditions were terrible. I talked with their staff photographer who explained where to be when to for the best takes of the fort: from Mount Defiance in the fall, from a particular inn in the winter. Such luxury. We have great opportunities to be places others can’t be. Still, at times, we just wish and dream. All it would take is a small RV and a couple scooters.

Click on image for larger view.

Read More

Revolutionary War Battle

Who needs H.G. Wells? We can do our own time shift at will. Thursday we rode back to pre-WWII times. Friday we went up a small mount to commune with mid-Nineteenth Century spirits. Saturday, it’s 1778 or so. The Revolutionary War is becoming intense – the British attack.

This weekend was Revolutionary War reenactment encampment time at Fort Ti (as Fort Ticonderoga is known to just about everyone around here and so also by us now). Quite some show. We had a grand time. Makes us want to go to a Civil War re-enactment in Northern Virginia. Then we could pretend we are some of the real spectators who traveled out from Washington to enjoy the Battle of Bull Run.

We weren’t the ones having the real fun. Consider the participants and their families. Spend hours, maybe years, researching and creating one’s uniform and weaponry. Camp out with a thousand comrades in arms. Shoot off enough black powder to satisfy the most enthusiastic pre-pubescent boy. Fight and die safely. (The reenactment only allows soldiers to die when it is safe so most of the casualties occurred at the end of the battle. I suppose no one wanted corpses rotting in the sun too long.) And then retire to camp to drink military camp punch or perhaps modern drink of sufficient potency. Not a bad deal.

Oh, and the British won this battle.

Click on image for larger view.

Read More

Vermont Countryside

Summer is over. Color is creeping into the hills. The fading glory of Golden Rod in the fields is most pleasant. Shadows become longer. Fields, while still green, assume a yellow cast. Soon all corn will be harvested.

Lake Champlain has been so kind to us. Since a front cleared out haze a week ago, we have had nice sunsets. Clouds make magic at sunset. They linger just above mountains to play with fading light and the mountains and with our senses. Last night, when we had only a hint of mountains, our clouds gave us a solo act light show.

People often ask us what our favorite places are. I suppose we would have to say any place we really look forward to revisiting. Penobscot Bay in Maine rates high on the list. Any place in Canada does as well because Canadians make their country such a pleasant experience. We now have a new favorite place: Lake Champlain.

We are also often asked how long we will wander by boat (don’t know – until it’s’ no longer enjoyable) and what we will do when that time comes. That I can answer: travel with camera in hand. Maybe spend a year in France – wouldn’t have to be in Peter Mayle’s Provence – anywhere. Explore the rolling hills and fields of Palouse’s farm country (SE Washington state) in the early summer and again at harvest time. We have made mental notes about what we would do if we had sufficient time to explore this area: barns – big, small, new, old, good shape, interestingly rundown – Federal style brick farm houses would offer a study in door fronts if nothing else. And to have the luxury we don’t now have to pick & choose where we are when according to the light available. We were at Fort Ti when light conditions were terrible. I talked with their staff photographer who explained where to be when to for the best takes of the fort: from Mount Defiance in the fall, from a particular inn in the winter. Such luxury. We have great opportunities to be places others can’t be. Still, at times, we just wish and dream. All it would take is a small RV and a couple scooters.

Click on image for larger view.

Read More

Vergennes Falls

We have been up proverbial creeks of all sorts often but never really up a river or creek to its fall line. Of course one goes up the creek only in the figurative sense. It’s an interesting experience when the main body of water is one that is often bounded by rock cliffs that come right down to the water. Otter Creek leading to Vergennes and its falls is bottom land, swampy with ferns and some mud flats and marsh grasses and over hanging trees. Familiar surroundings for anyone who has done any creek boating on farther south. It’s just that the trees are different. They still fall over into the creek to rot and possibly be a hazard to navigation.

Finally one rounds a bend and a small basin opens up to the falls. All that is left to is to tie up to the town dock and pretend the falls were put there just for us. They weren’t of course. Vergennes dates back to colonial times. So when a large rowing skiff from the nearby maritime museum goes out for a sojourn into the basin, we can pretend we are back when this town was a bustling shipyard community. The weather cooperates by laying down a heavy layer of clouds and shoots sunlight under that layer just before sunset.

Click on image for larger view.

Read More

Pot of Gold

Everyone is looking for the pot of gold at the end of the rainbow. Well folks, I know where it is: 44 32.9 N, 073 12.75 W. “Was” is probably a more accurate word. If one goes looking for the pot, Google Earth will suggest looking along the railroad tracks leading south out of Burlington. So that’s why the pot is so elusive. It rides around on a rail road car only occasionally passing through a sunny day shower. Want to chase that railroad car?  Check rail schedules in or out of Burlington 6:00 pm Sunday. Shot is time stamped 6:11 pm.

Click on image for larger view.

Read More
content top